Boeing 777-200ER vs 777-200LR – What Are The Key Differences?

Advertisement:

While we all know that the Boeing 777-200LR has a more extended range than the Boeing 777-200ER, we decided to take a look and see what other differences there are between the two planes. Designed to fill a gap between the 767 and 747 while at the same time replacing older DC-10 and TriStar L-1011 aircraft, Boeing came up with a plan to make a bigger 767 that they tentatively named the 767-X.

Boeing 777-200LR
The Boeing 777-200 was built to replace TriStars and the DC-10. Photo: Boeing

The initial design for the 767-X featured a longer fuselage and larger wings fitted with winglets. Boeing soon extended the fuselage cross-section but retained the 767 cockpit, nose, and other elements. Airlines seemed to be on a different page to Boeing, wanting a much broader, more fuel-efficient plane than the 767-X. The interior also needed to be flexible, and the aircraft had to be capable of flying intercontinental routes.

The 777 was born

Due to the airline’s demands, Boeing needed to scrap the 767-X idea and develop a brand new plane. Working together with All Nippon Airways, American Airlines, British Airways, Cathay Pacific, Delta Air Lines, Japan Airlines, Qantas, and United Airlines, Boeing developed the widebody 777. Chicago-based United Airlines became the launch customer for this type, placing an order for 34 planes with an option for 34 more on October 14, 1990.

The first Boeing 777 entered service with United on June 7, 1995, debuting on the airlines’ London Heathrow (LHR) to Dulles International Airport (IAD) route.

The 777-200LR has a longer range

Now with widebody aircraft that airlines wanted, Boeing began work on the 777-200ER and extended range version of the plane. With greater long-haul capabilities, the jet became the most widely ordered version of the 777 right through the early 2000s.

Ethiopian 777-200LR
Ethiopian Airlines was the first African airline to order the Boeing 777-200LR. Photo: Boeing

A second long-range version of the Boeing 777-200ER was certified by the FAA and EASA in February 2006 and immediately entered service with Pakistan International Airlines.

Advertisement:

Specifications Boeing 777-200ER

  • Passengers (3-class): 301
  • Range: 7,065 NM (13,080 km)
  • Length: 63.7 m (209 ft 1 in)
  • Wingspan: 64.8 m (212 ft 7 in)
  • Height: 18.5 m (60 ft 8 in)
  • Engine (2x): Pratt & Whitney PE4090; Rolls-Royce Trent 800; General Electric GE90-94B

Specifications Boeing 777-200LR

Advertisement:
  • Passengers (3-class): 301
  • Range: 8,555 NM (15,843 km)
  • Length: 63.7 m (209 ft 1 in)
  • Wingspan: 64.8 m (212 ft 7 in)
  • Height: 18.5 m (60 ft 8 in)
  • Engine (2x):GE90-110B; GE90-115B

Of the two, the 777-200ER was the best seller

Developed alongside the 777-300ER, the -200LR has an increased maximum takeoff weight (MTOW) and the option of three extra fuel tanks in the rear cargo hold. Additional features include a redesigned landing gear and 12.8 ft (3.90 m) wingtip extensions.

Boeing 777-200
The Boeing 777-200LR is used for the cargo version of the plane. Photo: Boeing

The Boeing 777-200LR is also the plane Boeing used for the freighter version of the aircraft. As far as sales are concerned, the Boeing 777-200ER far outsold the 777-200LR with 422 deliveries compared to just 60. Just looking at the sales figures alone, you can see that the ER version was more popular with airlines.

What’s the longest flight you have ever had on a Boeing 777-200ER or 777-200LR? Please tell us all about it in the comments.

Advertisement:
44 Shares: