The Boeing 737 MAX Won’t Be Recertified This Year Says FAA

The FAA’s Administrator, Steve Dickson, has told CNBC that the Boeing 737 MAX will not be recertified before the new year. The aircraft has been grounded for around 9 months now, or three quarters of a year.

Boeing, 737 MAX, FAA
The Boeing 737 MAX will not be recertified this year. Photo: Boeing

The Boeing 737 MAX has spent the majority of 2019 sat on the ground looking up at the skies. Following a second fatal crash linked to the aircraft’s MCAS system, the type was grounded in mid-March across the globe. Since then, there have been occasional repositioning flights, however, no new aircraft have been delivered. This has severely affected some customers that depend on Boeing aircraft, such as Ryanair and flydubai.

2020 recertification

Earlier today Steve Dickson, the Administrator of the Federal Aviation Authority, told CNBC that the Boeing 737 MAX’s recertification would not occur in 2019. There are just 20 full days left in the calendar year. This includes one federal holiday and six weekend days, giving just 13 office days.

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Mr Dickson told CNBC that there are around ten to eleven milestones still to be completed with regards to the recertification of the Boeing 737 MAX, though he didn’t elaborate on each one. He went on to tell the CNBC presenter: “If you just do the math it’s going to extend into 2020”.

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Boeing, 737 MAX, FAA
The comments were made by FAA Administrator Steve Dickson. Photo: Public Domain

In order to complete the process by the new year, both Boeing and the FAA would need to tick off roughly a milestone a day, which seems a big task. This is what prompted Mr Dickson’s comments earlier today. He did, however, refuse to give any timeline beyond ‘not in 2019’.

Boeing’s target scuppered

The news will mean that Boeing will not reach its recertification timeline set out in November. At the time, the American aerospace manufacturer said:

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“Boeing continues to target FAA certification of the MAX flight control software updates during this quarter. Based on this schedule, it is possible that the resumption of MAX deliveries to airline customers could begin in December, after certification, when the FAA issues an Airworthiness Directive rescinding the grounding order.”

Boeing, 737 MAX, FAA
The Boeing 737 MAX has been grounded for 9 months since March. Photo: Boeing

The company had also stated its intent for the aircraft to reenter commercial service in January. However, many airlines are currently targeting re-entry to service in March. That list includes the three United States operators.

This potentially means that the aircraft type could be out of commercial service for a year. Indeed, it is already three-quarters of the way there. Only time will tell what happens, as the FAA refuses to commit to a firm timeline. It seems that the job will be done when the job is done.

A Boeing spokesperson told Simple Flying: We continue to work closely with the FAA and global regulators towards certification and the safe return to service of the MAX.”

When do you think the Boeing 737 MAX will be recertified? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

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Tango Alpha

No surprise. Though Boeing have been hopeless optimistic. Quote from 6. August:
‘Muilenburg said that Boeing will submit its certification package to the FAA in September, and that he expects the MAX to return service early in the 4th quarter.’
That is long time ago.

Niklas Andersson

4th Quarter 2020…

Adam

4th quarter 2050….

JFP

4th quarter of when our sun goes explodes…

Bryce

That’s good news!
The world is a lot safer with that crate firmly sitting on the ground!

TheDude

Yeah hopefully you never have to go TOGA in a 320 NEO or the engines will probably quit on you…

Armand2REP

Only if they are supplied by P&W. Indigo had to remove 300 sets of P&W engines and replace them with LEAP. Pratt should never have been made an option.

High Mile Club

Boeing…can you just stop with the noise you’re making before you make your hole deeper? Who in their management is making these statements anyway? You can’t give special flights to other countries without the proper documentation for that aviation authority body. It might be possible in the States, but not anywhere else. Plus, the month is about half-way finished, so how do they expect to make any deliveries before the month is out? As far as the quarter, I’m aware that the current fiscal quarter doesn’t end until the last day in January, so it’ll be possible then if the… Read more »

Bryce

They probably regularly issue hot air in the hopes that they can positively influence investor sentiment.
The end of the year is traditionally a time when investors re-evaluate / expand their stock portfolios.
They’re probably hoping that Wall Street will be easily fooled by a few crumbs of hope.

High Mile Club

Trying to placate their investors isn’t going to do anything as long as the source of money remains grounded. That’s like trying to sell someone a good looking car that can’t drive anywhere because the engine is still under maintenance.

TheDude

A lot of experts around here it seems. Tell me which aircraft manufacturer you lot are the CEOs of?

High Mile Club

I can ask you the same question. You don’t need a bachelors in Business Management to recognize the signs of shady practices.

Niklas Andersson

Like this comment Msc Eng or MBA…
Maybe from TRUMP University ?

Frank

Niklas – I understand that for a few extra bucks into Donnie’s pocket, they’d even slap on a Doctoral designation to that. a few more bucks and you’d graduate with ‘High Covfefe Honours’…(or was it Magna Cum Covfefe?)

Anyways – all graduates whose payments were successfully processed received a special hamberder dinner, thrown in.

Niklas Andersson

Thank you Frank… Where did you get to buy your Master degree ?

Make Aircraft Great Again

JFP

And a President with degrees in Business and Finance got involved in the grounding!

TheDude

I know right? If it is so simple why aren’t you doing it?

Niklas Andersson

MD 😉

TonytTDK

I’m surprised Wall Street is STILL buying-into it.????
Boeing have been spinning tales of success for years now…… just about since pre-production of the B787 went pear-shaped & they had to put their 1st delivery date back 2 years.?

Gerry S

This Boeing nightmare seems unending. I really feel badly for the airlines involved. Especially Southwest. They are hurting. They are large enough to successfully diversify. But they won’t! Vendor loyalty is all well and good, but comes a time.

Bryce

TUI is indicating an expected turnover loss of 400 million euros for 2020 as a result of the MAX grounding.
Can you imagine how high the total damages will be when you include all airlines that are currently affected?
That’s looking like it’s going to cost Boeing tens of billions…

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-tui-results/tui-says-737-max-grounding-could-cost-it-400-mln-euros-in-2020-idUSKBN1YF1B2

Niklas Andersson

MAKE AIRCRAFT RIGHT AGAIN… Hahahahahaha

No… I thing more about our Colleagues in Boeing USA… We need Support THEM…( SOLIDARITY ) it’s not about THE GOOD ENGINEER in BOEING it’s MORE ABOUT Management Performance Issues within BOEING.

” In many instances, issues at the executive level manifest themselves in other ways; strategic planning becomes reactive and uninspired, financial management is protective of the status quo, and employee engagement suffers.

​Leadership looks for new management to fix the visible issues but the underlying problems persist.”

from a good and smart friend in http://www.scanditech.com

Frank

I wonder if Donnie is going to have all the airline execs in for a visit again and tell them all how they should be buying Boeing aircraft – then rant when Delta doesn’t show and how stupid they are to be buying Airbus. Donnie did such a great job when he had his airline, Trump Shuttle, you know…

Niklas Andersson

Frankly !?

Gerry S

Delta did not show because they are too professional and had better things to do; like run their airline. Taking advice from the CEO of Trump Shuttle (wait: it died a quick death) Never mind.

TonytTDK

Niklas,
AFAIK, no-one has anything bad to say about the people who’re actually building aircraft for Boeing or about any of their suppliers.? (other than the emergency oxygen suppliers.?)
The point seems to be that management have lost the plot & are more concerned with profits, share-price & dividends, than they are with producing safe, efficient airliners.?
The people on the shop-floor are just doing what they always did, to the best of their ability, as much as Boeing allow that to happen.?

JFP

Thanks to the FAA and the U.S. Government, there could soon be a new sound on the Boeing shop floor. Along with a sucking sound. As all those jobs the U.S. Government doesn’t want go to a country that will gratefully take them.

Frank

$5 billion a quarter. $15 billion and counting, so far.

Had they just not been so greedy, they could have taken that money, made a great narrowbody to rival the A320 line and still had their reputation intact.

At what point does someone finally stand up and say “Now we’re throwing good money, after bad…”?

TonytTDK

AFAIA, Boeing has painted itself into a corner. They got in trouble with the B787 during development. That cost them a lot of money, because they put back the launch by nearly 2 years.! Then they had the battery fires & the grounding & that cost them loads more money in compensation. They’ve probably had to discount a hell of a lot to restore confidence, so Boeing have probably had little or no actual net profit on the 787 yet.? The B777X was supposed to be flying by now ( I think the original debut customer was supposed to be… Read more »

Kevin

Remarkably insightful analogy, e.g. Lehman Brothers.

Frank

Tony, It’s really remarkable, that in world history you can go back to certain points in time, look at an event and then say “There! That’s it – that’s the point when the decision was made that started the mess”. Business schools in the future will have a great case study for students, on the saga of Boeing. Some might say it’s when they merged with MD, some might say it was the 787 decisions that they made, that leaves them with some $20 billion in sunk costs, today. Then there will be a 3rd group who will say it’s… Read more »

TonytTDK

Frank, I’ve said on other threads, that I truly believe that Boeing WILL fail.! I don’t particularly want it to, but I just can’t see how it can be carrying all the debt it has AND also develop the TWO brand new, clean-sheet airframes it needs, to actually compete against Airbus in the medium to long term.? The existing B777 is the jewel in the crown, because it’s seen-off both the B747 AND the A380. If Boeing goes under, the question on my lips would be; Will China buy it all up in a fire-sale, or will it go out… Read more »

TonytTDK

Incidentally, I think it’s the move away from Boeing Field & Seattle and over to Chicago that was ‘the’ event. From that point onwards, it seems like Boeing have been way more interested in the share price & the dividend, than they have in the product that they fly from their factory doors.? The shambles of the B787 parts not actually fitting together when they arrived for assembly, is testemant to the FACT, that Boing had stopped relying on engineers & engineering & started to rely on the ‘say so’ of their suppliers. We’ve recently heard that the B747 fuselage… Read more »

JFP

Tony, I fully expect Boeing to fail. The blame also needs to be placed in the hands of the U.S. Government which has been after Boeing for decades. However, should Boeing fail, I think the handwriting on the wall should be very visible to Lockheed-Martin and Northrop Grumman… Government contractors need to realize that government is like a cancer in that eventually it kills its host.