Edible Trays Could Soon Become Part Of Your Aircraft Meal

A design studio based in London has created a radical concept that could have a phenomenal impact on the way that meals are consumed onboard aircraft, while also reducing the environmental impact of dining. And the extraordinary concept involves trays that can be eaten!

Get On board edible trays
Photo: PriestmanGoode

Edible trays

The partially edible trays are constructed from materials such as used coffee grains and husks, alongside food containers made from wheat bran. Plastics are replaced by soluble seaweed, and banana leaves and algae are also combined with rice husk in order to create eco-friendly cups.

Get On board edible trays
Photo: PriestmanGoode

It remains to be seen how much this will catch on with airline passengers, but it is certainly a novel concept, and one primarily intended to reduce waste and carbon footprints related to flights.

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Get On board edible trays
Photo: PriestmanGoode

PriestmanGoode is the designer that can be credited with this idea, with the studio also swapping plastic cutlery for one simple ‘spork’ composed of coconut wood. Another innovation floated by PriestmanGoode is water bottles composed of cork and bioplastic, with a water cooler then provided on board in order to enable passengers to refill flasks while flying.

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Get On board edible trays
Photo: PriestmanGoode

London exhibition

The innovative trays and cutlery formed part of an exhibition intended to address waste in air travel. Named ‘Get Onboard: Reduce. Reuse. Rethink’, the exhibition being held at London’s Design Museum. And the designers are keen to open at the public’s eyes to the amount of waste associated with the travel industry, and airlines in particular.

On the website showcasing its exhibition, PriestmanGoode noted that,

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“an estimated 5.7 million tons of cabin waste is generated on passenger flights, from single-use plastic to meal trays and earphones.”

Get On board edible trays
Photo: PriestmanGoode

The studio goes on to explain that developments in ecologically-friendly materials, coupled with innovative initiatives from suppliers, could help change consumer behavior in a way that will be extremely positive for the ecology of the planet.

Important cuisine

Food is considered to be an increasingly important aspect of the airline experience, and carriers are now taking cuisine far more seriously. For example, Air Asia recently announced a move into the restaurant business, with the CEO of the company keen to serve customers the same food on the ground that they currently offer on-board flights.

AA Zoes kitchen
American Airlines has partnered with Zoe’s Kitchen for healthier food. Photo: AA

Other Carriers, such as American Airlines, have gone to great lengths in order to ensure that their cuisine is of the highest standard possible, with the huge American Airline having partnered with Zoës Kitchen in order to deliver an improved in-flight menu. Zoës Kitchen is particularly associated with healthy and wholesome food, underlining the shifting ethos in airline food.

Meanwhile, Simple Flying reported earlier this year that the size of meals in economy have been reduced in order for airlines to save fuel, and make flying more economical. This can be considered particularly important at a time when the airline industry must answer continual probing questions regarding its carbon footprint.

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N G McLeod

Used coffee grains, husks, wheat bran etc…no wonder they call it cattle class.

TheDude

“Meanwhile, Simple Flying reported earlier this year that the size of meals in economy have been reduced in order for airlines to save fuel.” Hahahahahaha yeah that’s the reason.

Jamie

Honestly – how poorly researched and worded. While these are technically edible, they are not designed for that purpose, it would not taste good, nor would it be hygenic. It is designed to be fully compostable, so that there is less wastage to landfill. The lack of even a mention of the concept of composting is incredibly disappointing.