What Happened To Failed Carrier FlyBMI Regional’s Fleet?

FlyBMI, previously BMI Regional, is just one of the airlines that we said goodbye to in 2019. Over its lifetime it had operated 32 aircraft, according to Air Fleets. However, at the time it ceased operations, the airline had just 17 aircraft. We take a look at what happened to its fleet…

What happened to FlyBMI’s 17 Embraer aircraft? Photo: Marvin Mutz via Flickr

The Embraer Jet

If FlyBMI’s last dying wish was to be known as a sole Embraer Jet operator, then it did well. At the time its operations terminated, it was flying 17 Embraer. It had a mixture of 145EU, 145EP, 135LR, and 135ER. It most favored the Embraer 145 with 15 of those active in its fleet. That 145 fleet was split up into three 145EU aircraft and 12 145EP.

Of all the jets it had, only two were kept in storage and the remaining all went to Loganair.

FlyBMI and Loganair

Loganair and FlyBMI were sister carriers and so it made sense that Loganair received the fleet. It had already taken two Embraer aircraft from FlyBMI the previous year, according to CH-Aviation, and when FlyBMI collapsed, it took on five of the airline’s routes.

But regarding FlyBMI’s suspended fleet, Loganair didn’t receive all the aircraft at the same time. It received them in bundles between February right after the collapse and July 2019.

G-RJXC was one of the aircraft to leave the FlyBMI fleet first in February 2019. Photo: Juke Schweizer via Wikimedia Commons

The first key date for the aircraft handover was on 22nd February 2019. A total of six aircraft left FlyBMI for Loganair at that point. On this day, the largest collection of aircraft left the FlyBMI fleet.

They were:

  • G-RJXC, acquired by FlyBMI in February 2001. The aircraft is now active with Loganair and registered as G-SAJK.
  • G-RJXD, arrived to FlyBMI in February 2001. Now active with Loganair under the registration G-SAJN. This aircraft has now been renamed as Clan Macinnes.
  • G-RJXM, acquired by FlyBMI in December 2005. Now active with Loganair under the registration G-SAJO.
  • G-RJXE, acquired by FlyBMI in February 2001. Now active and registered with Loganair as G-SAJF, or Clan Macduff.
  • G-RJXH, acquired by FlyBMI in June 2001. Now active with Loganair with the same registration.
  • G-RJXI, owned by FlyBMI from June 2001. Leased to Brussels Airlines in March 2014. Returned to FlyBMI in October 2017. Now active with Loganair and registered as G-SAJD.

The March aircraft transfers

By the end of the next month, nearly all of FlyBMI’s aircraft had left the fleet. The airline transferred eight aircraft to Loganair within March. On 8th March 2019, three aircraft were given to Loganair.

  • G-EMBI, acquired by FlyBMI in June 2009 after two years with Flybe. Now active with Loganair under the registration, G-SAJG.
  • G-EMBJ, acquired by FlyBMI in July 2009 after two years with Flybe. Now active with Loganair under the registration, G-SAJH.
  • G-EMBN, entered the FlyBMI fleet in October 2008, having arrived at Flybe in March 2007. Now active with Loganair operating as G-SAJI.

On 12th March 2019, just one was transferred to Loganair:

  • G-RJXP, acquired by FlyBMI in January 2008 from City Airline. Now active with Loganair as G-SAJR.

On 22nd March 2019, three aircraft left for Loganair. They were:

  • G-RJXA, acquired by FlyBMI in February 2001. Now active with Loganair under the registration, G-SAJL.
  • G-RJXB, acquired by FlyBMI in February 2001. Now active with Loganair as G-SAJJ.
  • G-RJXK, acquired by FlyBMI in September 2001. Now active with Loganair and registered as G-SAJU.
G-RJXK was one of FlyBMI’s ERJ135 which is now active with Loganair. Photo: Peter Bakema via Wikimedia Commons

The final of the March transfers happened on 29th March 2019.

  • G-RJXL, acquired by FlyBMI in December 2004. Now active with Loganair under the registration G-SAJT.

On 19th July 2019, the last aircraft went to Loganair. It was:

  • G-RJXG, acquired by FlyBMI in February 2002. Now active with Loganair under the registration G-SAJS, or the name Clan Dalziel.

Two aircraft in storage

Despite having given most of its aircraft to Loganair to continue in our skies, the airline did keep two of its aircraft. FlyBMI is recorded to have two Embraer 145EU stored.

These aircraft both came from French airline HOP! in 2017. The registrations of the aircraft are G-CKAG and G-CKAF. But the fate of these aircraft is yet unknown. Could they join the rest of the ex-FlyBMI fleet on a jaunt with Loganair?

The Embraer models

At the time of the collapse, FlyBMI was operating four types of Embraer. But what was the difference between them?

The 135 models were 135LR and 135ER. 135ER is the base model of 135. It can seat up to 37 passengers and its developed for extended range.

The 135LR builds on the previous model. The letters LR stand for Long Range, which means the aircraft has increased fuel capacity as well as upgraded engines.

The models of 145 that the airline was operating were 145EU and 145EP.

The 145EU was the European Market adapted Embraer. It has a maximum take-off weight (MTOW) of 19,990 kg, making it able to bear more weight than its 145 predecessors.

The 145EP is built upon the extended-range model of the 145. It had an MTOW larger than the 145EU at 20,990 kg but has the same fuel capacity as the Extended Range model (4,174 kg).

Do you remember FlyBMI’s Embraer fleet? Let us know in the comments!

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AndrewS

Simple Flying so piece correct, but Bigger Picture Flying, it demonstrates how the same company left it’s losses…& employees behind…legal but cynical