Lufthansa Quietly Reveals New Boeing 777X Premium Economy Seat

Lufthansa has quietly revealed its new Boeing 777X premium economy seat. The announcement was made as part of the Capital Markets Day in Frankfurt yesterday.

Lufthansa Boeing 777X premium economy
Lufthansa’s new Boeing 777X aircraft will receive a new premium economy cabin. Photo: Lufthansa

Lufthansa is the launch customer of the Boeing 777X and, as such, is expecting the first production aircraft. However, things could be delayed as the aircraft is yet to take its first flight. Indeed, the American manufacturer had hoped to showcase the aircraft at the recent Paris Air Show. However, the aircraft did complete its first taxi tests last week, which marked a huge milestone for the manufacturer.

The new Lufthansa seat

Lufthansa’s new seat will debut onboard their Boeing 777X aircraft from next year, before being retrofitted to some older aircraft. Indeed, the new seat will be found onboard the Boeing 777-9 from Q3 of 2020. This is according to a presentation given by the airline yesterday.

The fun doesn’t stop with Lufthansa though! SWISS passengers are also due to experience the new Lufthansa Group premium economy offering. From early 2021, the seat will be introduced on SWISS Boeing 777-3 aircraft. The seat will join the SWISS Airbus A340-300 aircraft afterwards, with the retrofit slated to be introduced from Q2 of 2021 onwards.

Lufthansa Boeing 777X premium economy
The new premium economy cabin was revealed at the airline’s Capital Markets Day held in Frankfurt. Photo: Lufthansa

A340 lifeline

This last point is interesting. It shows that SWISS is committed to operating the Airbus A340-300 for a while longer. The airline currently has five of the aircraft in their fleet with an average age of 15.5 years. Currently, many airlines are retiring their four-engined aircraft in favour of more efficient twin engined jets.

Indeed, Qatar Airways won’t fit the Qsuite to the Airbus A380, as they plan to retire them in five years time, making them around ten years old at retirement. By contrast, SWISS’ A340s will be 17 years old when they receive new seats. With this in mind, the Lufthansa Group is unlikely to be scrapping the planes anytime soon, or the retrofit would be a waste of money.

Lufthansa Group Boeing 777X premium economy
SWISS’ Airbus A340 aircraft will also receive the new premium economy product. Photo: SWISS

Why invest in premium economy?

According to figures released by the Lufthansa Group, the premium economy cabin is one of the best revenue drivers on the aircraft. In fact, revenue per square meter is 33% more in premium economy than in economy. This is as the product costs the airline only slightly more to provide, but will have a much higher ticket price attached.

However, what is more interesting is that the revenue per square meter of premium economy is 6% higher than that of business class. The Boeing 777X will only have three cabins. Business class, premium economy, and economy. With this in mind, the premium economy cabin will have the largest revenue per square meter on the aircraft. As such, it makes sense for the Lufthansa Group to spend a tidy amount on it.

What do you think of the Lufthansa Group’s new premium economy seat? Let us know in the comments!

2 comments
  1. There seems to be an upcoming two track tendency in customers flying preferences:
    • On one hand they suspend the ultimate luxury of 1e Class in favour of Business,
    • on the other hand economy passengers are happy to pay for some more essential comfort offered in Premium-economy.
    A (small) part 1e C passengers moves to the versatility of private (co-shared) jets.

    The success of Premium Economy certainly is driven by increasing wealth and the longer time we spend on planes.
    Cattle class at flag carriers ’ll shrink this decade in favour of more essential comfortable Premium E-Class seating.

    The growing demand for long haul point to point connections will boost ultra long haul flights (16+ hours).
    Airlines will offer on these flights as well as real sleeping facilities on a shared blocks hour bases in cargo spaces, as socialising spaces, both encouraging passengers well feeling on such flights.
    All of this belongs (as bookable options) to the E-Premium flight guests.

    So it’ll get much more complex for airlines figuring out their cabin configuration in this increasingly demanding market. Except from choosing the right routes, this’ll be most challenging issue in aviation.

    And what about ULCC and LCC’s?
    Being for numerous the entry to aviation, those airlines ’ll sensitively remain suffering the up and downs in the growth of the worlds prosperity. So investing in aircraft paintshops is not bad.

  2. Lufthansa’s Premium Economy class is increasingly disappointing. The best premium economy classes are in a separate cabin. Lufthansa seems to be opting for shoving PE at the front of economy, with no real separation of cabins — all the while charging a significantly higher price. I used to fly Lufthansa PE several times a year. But it does not deliver the customer experience that others do (and for lower fares — for example, American’s transatlantic PE from CDG to PHL is significantly cheaper than Lufthansa’s FRA-PHL PE and provides a MUCH, MUCH better experience).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recommended Stories: