First Ryanair Buzz Livery Spotted – On A Boeing 737 MAX!

The first aircraft in Ryanair’s new Buzz livery has been spotted in Seattle. The aircraft wearing the design is a Boeing 737 MAX, affectionately known as the Boeing 737-8200 by Ryanair. It will join Ryanair’s Polish subsidiary when the MAX grounding is lifted.

Ryanair, Buzz, Boeing 737 MAX
Ryanair’s new Buzz livery has been spotted… on a Boeing 737 MAX. Photo: Boeing

Earlier this year, Ryanair announced that it would rebrand its Polish subsidiary. This sees the airline changing its name from Ryanair Sun to Buzz, accompanied by a questionable new livery. As no existing Boeing 737s have been repainted in the new livery, it seems as though we will have to wait for the Boeing 737 MAX’s delivery for the livery to take to the skies.

Ryanair and the MAX

Ryanair has a big order for the Boeing 737 MAX. In fact, according to Boeing’s latest order book, this 135 aircraft order accounts for almost 3% of total unfulfilled orders for the aircraft type.

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This has left Ryanair with a big problem, as they will be short of 10-20 aircraft over the summer period in 2020. This has led to the airline cutting its expansion plans, in addition to announcing base closures. Ryanair has also said that it won’t tell passengers if they’re flying on a Boeing 737 MAX, having been spotted rebranding the type as the Boeing 737-8200.

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Ryanair, Buzz, Boeing 737 MAX
What the livery looks like (Picture: Boeing 737-800). Photo: Ryanair

This is a type which, due to its larger than usual capacity, is still to receive its certification from the Federal Aviation Authority. The Air Current in November reported that the 200 capacity variant of the aircraft produced just for Ryanair had into design issues, separate to the aircraft’s general MCAS related grounding.

Boeing 737 MAX headed to Buzz

We now know that some of Ryanair’s Boeing 737 MAX aircraft will be heading to Buzz according to the airline’s chief pilot on LinkedIn. He shared an image of the aircraft with split wingtips and the iconic nacelles of the 737 MAX engine.

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In the comments of the post, he confirmed that the existing Boeing 737 aircraft in the Ryanair paint scheme would not be repainted into the Buzz paint scheme. This is likely a cost-saving exercise and could mean that other Ryanair group liveries, such as the red of Malta Air, are only seen on the Boeing 737 MAX too.

It’s unclear when the first Boeing 737 MAX will be delivered to Buzz. However, one thing is almost certain. Ryanair looks to be trying to keep the focus off of the MAX. The airline seems to have renamed the aircraft to the Boeing 737-8200. Something backed up by Buzz’s chief pilot in the comments of the earlier mentioned LinkedIn post.

Would you fly on the Boeing 737 MAX? What do you think of the Buzz paint scheme? Let us know your thoughts in the comments!

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Herbert Suter

For me, boeing had been canceled long ago. Only use airlines with Airbus from A to B, even after stopovers. This company Boeing should be closed. Airlines ordering new MAX should be punished.

Niklas Andersson

Real Buzz…
No one will fly with it … in Europe.
Stubborn RyanAir and Boeing doesn’t understand
Outsmart customers will be a ” Trump/Huge ” cost.
Good Luck

Remy

I will never fly with a Boeing 737 MAX. Not because I am afraid, but because I refuse to fly a plane that has a design flaw and some software to fix this. Software that was deliberately kept out of the manuals by Boeing before two deadly crashes happened.

Pac

Typical of RyanAir to be misleading with customers – 737 Max is full of problems besides what we know of. It is very sad for Boeing to have let the finance dept. run the business instead of its engineer one like they used to do it….& we all saw the sad results!

For ever NO to the 737 Max- let’s make sure that people have not lost their lives for nothing. Boeing make a new plane, start from scratch and be the best once again!

Gumemo

Definitely Yesss. One of the best planes ever made.

P J D

I will not fly the B737 max.. If I can’t determine if it will fly on my planned route I will not fly any airline that uses it. The B737 is a good airplane that has been redesigned into an aircraft B737max that requires complicated computer systems to maintain stability in certain flight conditions. The FAA are not satisfied since last march that it deserves certification. How many issues are there to fix.?

Dennis E Sullens

Software will not fix Boeing 737 Max’s bad Airframe.

Back in 2012 when the Max failed the FAA “Stall Characteristics” testing, Ref: 14CFR 25.203(a), Boeing decided to solve the problem with MCAS instead of solving the “Root Cause” of the Max “Negative Static Stability” (Tendancy to Stall) caused by placing the larger CFM Leap 1B Engines forward and up in front of the the wing, forward of the Center of Gravity.

What many Aviation Engineers have suggested, and EASA’s Patrick Ky have suggested is a Re-engineering Solution by making the Main Landing Gear Taller, and then place the larger Leap engines PROPERLY under the wing close to the Center of Gravity, thereby passing the required FAA Regulations without MCAS. No MCAS, no problems, everybody is happy!!!

This Software Solution with MCAS is a Patch or Band Aid solution, by Re-engineering the Airframe, and solving the Root Cause of the problem …. eventually most people will begin to trust flying a Max again.

For me, I will NEVER fly a Max again, no mater what they rename it as, until and unless they fix the Airframe as suggested above. Dennis E Sullens; 29 year’s in Aviation Quality Assurance, 19 year’s with Boeing, Retired.

Dennis E Sullens

I will NEVER fly a 737 Max by any name (eg Ryan Air 737-8200), unless Boeing fixes the bad Airframe so that it flies great, without MCAS, and passes all FAA Regulations, and any other foreign countries Civil Aviation Authority.

J.H.Cagney

Too much still going on for me to fly on the Max
Rebranding,new livery is a scam
Design fault patch up
So sorry, Ryanair you are not getting me on board

Person

Jeez, why are the comment sections of articles about the MAX and Boeing just used to hate on the aircraft and the company? Even if they’re just articles about new liveries being spotted on the aircraft! The livery looks kind of like a kids’ book illustration or an advertisement. Not my favorite.

Normand

I will fly with any aircraft including 737MAX as long as the people are honest and transparent. Hope everybody in the any industrie would learned a lesson from Boeing, When you have a responsibility working with the public you have to make sure 100% before launching a new things.
I’m a big fan of FAA organisations – Thanks to them to be there.

Panda

I will make sure all my friends in Poland are aware of all this. Perhaps we gonna work on some publicity to spread an awareness there 😉 Changing the name of the aircraft is just a really dirty trick

Dennis E Sullens

Boeing’s MCAS Software Solution is a Patch or Band Aid solution to the Root Cause of the problem that is the Improper placement of the larger CFM Leap 1B Engines forward and up in front of the wings, forward of the Center of Gravity causing Negative Static Stability (Tendancy to Stall) during certain required FAA maneuvers. For example, High Angle of Attack, at low speeds, such as during Takeoff.

To solve the Root Cause of the problem, Boeing needs to use Taller Main Landing Gear and then reposition the larger Leap engines PROPERLY under the wing, close to the Center of Gravity as on the Next Generation 737 aircraft. The 737NG Aircraft do not have, and do not need MCAS.

No MCAS. No problems. Everybody is happy.

I will NEVER fly on a 737 Max until Boeing and the FAA solve the Root Cause of the problem.

IanFromHKG

Ryanair didn’t rename the aircraft, Boeing did – and before the fatal crashes:
https://www.flightglobal.com/fleets/new-name-for-ryanair-737-max-is-not-actually-new/133547.article

John

Putting in a third escape door is not much good when the plane stalls. Hmmm

john

The Irish are famous for blarney, but this takes the cake.