Slovenia Is Selling 1,734 Adria Airways Uniforms

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Adria Airways uniforms are about to be put on sale in Slovenia. This is being done by the administrators, as part of the process of selling off all assets of this former Slovenian national airline, which declared bankruptcy in September.

Adria Airways A319
Adria Airways assets are being out on sale. Photo: Getty

The uniforms are on sale

Ex-Yu Aviation News reports that the bankruptcy administrator of Adria Airways is going to sell a total of 1,734 crew uniforms formerly belonging to this airline.

A tender procedure has been launched. All interested parties must submit a €5,000 (just over $5,300) deposit to participate in the tender.

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The starting price of these clothing items, which make up the 1,734 uniforms, has been set at €50,000 ($53,800). The tender is an auction, so the final price is yet unknown. No bids below this starting price will be accepted.

The submission of bids ends on April 14th. After this deadline, fifteen days will pass before the bankruptcy administrator of Adria Airways selects the winner.

It will be interesting to see how much these uniforms sell for, and whether anyone ends up bidding at all.

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Adria Airways
Adria Airways uniforms are being sold on an auction, after Adria’s AOC was sold off too. Photo: Getty

Not the first auction of Adria Airways assets

This is actually not the first auction surrounding Adria Airways that the bankruptcy administrator conducted in Ljubljana, Slovenia.

In January, as Simple Flying reported at the time, there was an auction of the Adria Airways Air Operator Certificate (AOC). Three bids were submitted. One of these was a former Adria Airways pilot.

The result of the auction was proclaimed a success by the bankruptcy administrator Janez Pustatičnik. This is despite the fact that the final price achieved was the same as the auction starting price. This means that two of the three bidders did not submit any bids at all, despite paying to participate. That price was €45,000 ($49,650).

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That day, the Adria Airways AOC was acquired by Montenegrin businessman Izet Rastoder, who owns one of Europe’s biggest banana import and export businesses.

Thus, the Adria Airways AOC, which is one of its most valuable assets, is now owned by The King of Bananas.

Lufthansa new livery
Lufthansa is one of many carriers that stepped into the Slovenian market to replace Adria Airways’ routes. Photo: Getty

Does Slovenia need a new flag carrier?

The Slovenian government originally estimated that re-establishing a new national airline would take until February 2020. But, within weeks of Adria going bankrupt, foreign airlines have stepped up their presence in the nation to such a degree that Slovenia had already given up on this plan by the end of 2019.

As Simple Flying reported in December, most of the routes that Slovenia lost with Adria’s demise have been replaced. Lufthansa Group has launched a whole network out of Ljubljana. Wizz Air is returning, Iberia is arriving, and Montenegro Airlines, Aeroflot and Air France have all doubled frequencies to Ljubljana.

Then came the recent negative developments for the aviation industry, and now any intention of setting up an Adria 2.0 is no longer viable. The Slovenian government is thus now occupied with selling Adria’s assets.

But will anyone be interested in a bulk purchase of used Adria uniforms?

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National Poet Of Slovenia In A Language People Understand

Auction-going is a cliquey and somewhat peculiar process in Slovenia. These official auctions have three rounds, weeks or months apart, with the reserve reduced in each round. The result is nobody knows what’s going on, and anyone who is in on the game waits until the third round. This semi-opaque process is a sort of auction, but not as we know it. Valuation is error-prone and expensive, and price expectations unrealistic, multiplied by a thick layer of lawyering, politicking, and bureaucratic self-worth. Typically there are no bids for these business remnants, even in the third round – or the lowest possible price is obtained with the least competition to impede the expected winner – just about the opposite of what a real auction aims to achieve. Similar behaviours surround the country’s “bad bank” BAMC.