US Airlines Are Now Hoping For A June Return For The 737 MAX

Southwest Airlines has joined the growing number of airlines pushing the Boeing 737 MAX’s return to service to June. The aircraft has been grounded for about 10 months now, following two fatal crashes of the type.

Boeing 737 MAX, Southwest Airlines, Grounding
Southwest’s Boeing 737 MAX Aircraft are currently parked in the desert. Photo: Getty Images

Month by month, we’ve slowly seen the Boeing 737 MAX’s return to service pushed back. Each time that one of the three US operators of the type pushes the return date back, the other two seem to follow suit fairly quickly. Last night American Airlines pushed back the return to June 2020. Now, sure enough, Southwest has quickly followed suit, delaying the aircraft’s return to June.

When will the Boeing 737 MAX return to the skies?

It’s impossible to say with any certainty when the short-haul aircraft will return to the skies. The narrowbody aircraft’s date keeps getting pushed back. As a result, there’s nothing to say that it won’t be pushed again to July, or possibly later.

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Both Boeing and the FAA are refusing to give a definitive timeline as to when the process of returning the aircraft to service is set to be completed. Instead, it seems more of a case of “how long is a piece of string”, and it’ll be finished when it’s finished.

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Boeing 737 MAX
It’s a new crisis for the US planemaker. Photo: Getty Images

Last year, Boeing was hoping that it could’ve resumed deliveries of the MAX by now. However, this has not been the case as the FAA takes each step as it comes. This means that the manufacturer has been forced to stall the production of the aircraft. Each aircraft takes up a set amount of space on the ground. The manufacturer has been running out of this space.

Will passengers fly on a recertified Boeing 737 MAX?

Like Marmite, this seems a hotly debated topic. Many have said that they will never fly on the Boeing 737 MAX again. However, others have said that they will fly on it without worry. It’s important to remember that once it returns to the skies this will be, arguably, the most scrutinized aircraft on the planet. No stone will be left unturned as any further incident could jeopardize the reputation of both the FAA and Boeing.

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Exactly when this will take place is anybody’s guess. However, I believe that enough people will still fly on this aircraft. Airlines like Ryanair won’t publish whether a flight is being operated by a Boeing 737 MAX, or a non-MAX aircraft. Additionally, will a large number of people be able to tell the difference between the two aircraft?

Southwest Airlines, Basic Economy, Gary Kelly
Will passengers jump right back on the aircraft? Photo: Getty Images

There is a final group of passengers, who wouldn’t fly on the aircraft immediately. Some have said that they will wait for a year or two of successful service without any further incidents before flying on the aircraft.

Would you fly on the aircraft, or avoid it at all costs? Let us know your thoughts in the comments!

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TheDude

I’d fly on it for sure.

Frank

…and here’s why we applaud you bravery, Dude. “Government panel: FAA process that approved Boeing 737 Max is ‘rigorous, robust’” https://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-biz-boeing-737-max-faa-certification-20200116-o5okyfsfdvaynkxms4jbvewf7q-story.html So the committee that Mitch’s wife put together has declared the process sound and having the FAA in bed with Boeing is a good thing for industry. “The committee found in a report released Thursday that the FAA’s system of delegating some inspections to aircraft manufacturers is effective and allows the U.S. industry to thrive.” Dude – you go ahead and put your life in the hands of people who obviously don’t give a damn, as employees at Boeing… Read more »

TheDude

Blah blah blah. People said the same thing about the first Airbus crash largely attributed due to the pilots not being prepared for the computers. People said the 747 was too big. people said the 380 was too big. People say a lot of stuff. Mostly untrue and riddled with emotions. Flying is inherently risky and unnatural. Just like jumping out of a plane. Things happen but most of the time you are safe. But it is a risk every time.

Frank

Nice. Deflect, belittle and ignore. Yes, flying is risky – but those manufacturers who care about safety and putting out a quality product seem to be able to mitigate it. I guess that is why Boeing is having so many problems today and others seem to be able to keep their aircraft from being grounded. People do indeed say a lot of stuff – especially the airlines who own the Max and seem to be continually pushing back the date of their re-entry into service. Also the employees who internal communications we read recently – they seem to say a… Read more »

TheDude

Boeing didn’t deflect everything. Heck even the reports cited the airlines and the pilots as part of the problem.

Frank

You’re still trying to go there? After all this time…smh.

TonytTDK

There’s always an element of risk in anything. Businesses which manufacture complex products, such a the companies who build nuclear power stations, don’t just say; “hey, chill. Nuclear power’s dangerous, you know….. So if it blows up, it blows up. Not really our problem…… We’ll be miles away by then.???” They say “Nuclear power’s dangerous, so we’re going to do everything we can to minimise & mitigate that, to make it a safe as we possibly can make it.” When Boeing cut all the corners to get the MAX into service asap, they certainly weren’t doing everything possible to make… Read more »

Gregory van Selm

Idk if its just me, but i feel like ryanair not telling ppl that its a max is kinda wrong

TonytTDK

GvS,
Ryanair certainly aren’t the only airline who’re going down that line of deception.!!!

Frank

Remember when Boeing said the Max would be back in service by June…..2019?
If not for ego, they probably could have gotten a non-MCAS Max certified by now and since they have accepted sim training, they could have been done with this mess. Instead it’s 5 billion a quarter and counting.

Jeremy

Nearly every week we read a new 737 MAX scandal. The last one was “Clowns designed this aircraft”. Eveybody knows that “This aircraft is an absolute flying coffin”. But they are still trying to bring it to the skies. I think Airliners are waiting another crash to crush the MAX series.

Trent

Boeing itself called this a flying turd. In reality, I’ll fly on it, but i’d spend a little extra per ticket to avoid it.

TheDude

No a couple grumpy pilots called it that yet they continued to fly it.

Trent

Alright Mr. Muilenburg

TheDude

Well it was. All the stuff in the press was the test pilots. I know facts are frowned upon here.

Frank

You mean alternative facts, right?

TheDude

You’re kidding right? The name quoted said CHIEF TEST PILOT.

TonytTDK

Yes. Chief TEST pilot.
Not line pilot with 2 hours of iPAD ‘conversion training’.
The guys who called it a ‘turd’ were Boeing’s OWN people, who HAD to test fly it, because that’s their job.
They’re also the guys who worked-out the method of resolving the MCAS failure procedure……. but of course, when they were working on solving the issue they ALREADY KNEW it was going to happpen. It didn’t surprise them out of the blue, because they’d never been told the sytem even existed, like the first flight crew.?

Frank

In other Max breaking news, which I’m sure SF will soon put an article up, Donnie’s panel of experts (appointed by Elisabeth Chao, Moscow Mitch’s wife) has deemed the certification process between Boeing and the FAA as robust and rigorous!

https://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-biz-boeing-737-max-faa-certification-20200116-o5okyfsfdvaynkxms4jbvewf7q-story.html

Now I guess everyone can see why we’re a little sceptical about everything Boeing…

TheDude

Great someone with TDS…like we can take what you just said seriously. You know the approvals for all the Max stuff happened under obama, correct?

Frank

Whoa – someone has their panties in a twist. But let’s have a look-see on who’s FAA certified the Max for entry into service, shall we? (before we go around trying to push the blame on other people, kinda like Boeing did with the two crashes)

Boeing 737 MAX
First flight January 29, 2016[1]
Introduction May 22, 2017 with Malindo Air
The 737 MAX gained Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification on March 8, 2017.[11]

Who was President on March 8, 2017 & May 22, 2017?

45th President of the United States
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 20, 2017

Own it.

TonytTDK

Frank 1 (million) v TheDude -3
maybe the dude can recover in the final quarter.
(unlikely as he’s a one-eyed Boeing fanboy, who seems to put his perfectly reasonable personal pride in the USA, over the safety of passenger aircraft out in the real world.!)

Frank

Well Tony, some people you just can’t help…but that doesn’t stop us from trying.

TheDude

You aren’t very smart are you? Every system approved had to open under Obama. It is simple math. The plane was approved and built under Obama. FACT. Can’t argue that. PERIOD.

Frank

Someone is triggered ^^^ Sorry sonny, but no. Donnie wants to take credit for how safe air travel is, the buck stops with him. It was, in fact, his FAA that certified the Max into service. It was his FAA that was the last to ground it and now it’s his Transportation Secretary who deemed the process that put the Max in the air ‘robust and rigorous’. His FAA signed the aircraft into service – just like Muilenberg took the fall for the program which was not started on his watch – but which he signed off on, as the… Read more »

TonytTDK

It truly is outlandish, that anyone would actually believe the findings of this congressional committee.! How partisan can this committee actually be. The FAA certified an aircraft, which then had two crashes, with loss of all on board on each occasion. The subsequent grounding of that aircraft has revealed an extensive number of additional issues which went undetected in the previous “robust & rigorous” certification process. These undetected problems missed by that “robust & rigorous” process have now caused this “turd” to remain grounded for currently TEN MONTHS & it is looking likely that it’s going to be perhaps FOURTEEN… Read more »

Gerry S

When MAX is certified I will have no qualms flying in it. If FAA says it is good to go, then I am good to go. Forget that stuff about Mitch's wife, Elaine. The Republicans do not control the FAA. The subject is the airplane itself. If it is certified problem- free, then count me aboard. I must confess however, that my short flights are usually on Delta, Jet Blue and Spirits Airbuses.

TheDude

Lucky you. I get stuck on Delta MDs.

Frank

“The Republicans do not control the FAA”

(this is straight off of wiki)

” In March 2019, President Donald Trump nominated Stephen Dickson to be Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration and the Chairman of the Air Traffic Services Committee.[3] On July 27, the United States Senate confirmed Dickson in a 52-40 vote.”

Senate has a repub majority and what party was Donnie representing (after his own interest, of course)?

But have no fear, Gerry, Delta is slowly retiring the Angry Puppies and you’ll have a fleet of brand spanking new, state of the art, A220’s to jet around in. Enjoy!

TonytTDK

Gerry S,
Great pro-Boeing, pro-FAA, pro-USA speech…….

Perhaps you’ve FORGOTTEN that the same FAA has ALREADY certified the failed & twice crashed in service MAX.
Perhapes you’ve FORGOTTEN that the same Boeing ALREADY knew that there were genuine issues with the MAX AND that they covered it up…….. except for the times when they bullied the all-American FAA into covering it up for them.!

Or maybe you just don’t care about passenger safety……….. including your own.?

Frank

I’m not sure about the veracity of this claim, but I put it up as a potential outcome for the 737 Max: Jason Robertson 5 hours ago I am a Pilot at AA. We have been told that the Max will not be recertified by FAA until July or August. We will start Sim-Ground Training in September. Max will be added to schedule in Nov 2020. Basically Max is out of service at AA all of 2020. I do not vouch for the identity of the individual but here is the link to the youtube video and comments section where… Read more »

TonytTDK

WOW.!
That really is a surprise.
In my own head, I’ve been anticipating an April/May re-certification.?

If November’s going to turn out to be the actual re-certification date, it’s going to make SouthWest & AA’s scheduling programme look a bit silly.?

FLyer

These posts need to stop. Just say that MAXes may or may not be reinstated in 2022. Until then, we are not going to further comment on it.

TonytTDK

FLyer,
A very good point……..
but,
Not nearly so interesting….
#schadenfreude.?

Kia lafaele

I have faith if pilots flying the plane have confidence and confirm the plane is safe

Shapes

It would seem that report was written to exonerate boing and blatantly ignores the damming releases just out. It’s a complete whitewash.we are back to “runaway trim” as a cover for MCAS. It’s so contradictionary to what we know now, why would anyone take what it says seriously. It carries the same tones and attitudes as mullborgs unbelievable press outings.
It’s a joke.